Showing posts with label tolerance. Show all posts
Showing posts with label tolerance. Show all posts

Friday, August 10, 2012

FREE "One World" Posters from Teaching Tolerance

I have shared many times how much I absolutely love the Teaching Tolerance website.  They have soooo many great activities and lessons, many of which I have used in my work as a school counselor.

One of my favorite parts of theTeaching Tolerance Magazine (that educators can receive for FREE) is the "One World" poster at the back.  The "One World" posters are always so beautiful and have such a great message.  I was so excited to learn yesterday that Teaching Tolerance has select "One World" posters available for you to download on their website for FREE!  The image quality is great so you can get them printed to up to 11" x 17" size to hang in your school counseling office or somewhere in your school! 

You can also do a search and find other smaller "One World" posters available to download for FREE!

This "One World" poster below reminded me of the work we do as school counselors.


Which Teaching Tolerance "One World" poster is your favorite?  Where will you hang your FREE "One World" Posters?

Comment below, tweetcontact Danielle, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources. Connect with Danielle via emailTwitter, PinterestLinkedInGoogle+, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.

Friday, September 9, 2011

Pinwheels for Peace

Design Your Own Jumbo Paper Pinwheels (2 dz)International Peace Day is on September 21st.

To celebrate and spread the message at our school, my school counseling colleague and I are collaborating with the art teachers to facilitate the Pinwheels for Peace Project at our school.

Pinwheels for Peace is a visual and artistic way to celebrate International Peace Day. Students create pinwheels to display at the school as a symbol of peace. At my school, students in third through eighth grade will be making pinwheels to display. A free template to create your own pinwheels is available on the Pinwheels for Peace website.

Instead of celebrating International Peace day on the actual day, we are having a "Peace Week" at our school to commemorate the 10th anniversary of 9/11 and to spread the message of peace at our school.

We plan to display the student created Pinwheels for Peace in the lawn of our school in time for our open house.

Have you ever done the Pinwheels for Peace Project at your school? What plans do you have to celebrate International Peace Day or commemorate 9/11? Comment below, tweet, or contact Danielle, share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, 
creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.

   

Thursday, September 8, 2011

9/11 Resources and Activities

America Is Under Attack: September 11, 2001: The Day the Towers Fell (Actual Times)Looking for ways to commemorate the 10th Anniversary of 9/11? Here are some links to resources. Please help other school counselors by sharing any resources you find in the comment section.

10 Days of Peace: Starting on 9/11 and ending on International Day of Peace, 9/22




Understanding 9/11 from Scholastic

Remembering 9/11 and Memories Shared from Reading Rockets


Also check out my post about Pinwheels for Peace. That is how we will be commemorating the tenth anniversary of 9/11 at my school. 

How are you commemorating the 10th anniversary of 9/11 at your school? Do you have any resources to share? Comment below, tweet, or contact Danielle, share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.


Sunday, April 17, 2011

"It's What's on the Inside That Counts!"

I am currently running a group for children with a loved one in jail. One of the activities I have facilitated with my group is the kiwi lesson.  The kiwi lesson can be used to address many different topics including stigma, shame, diversity, tolerance, body image, and more.  This lesson is fun and engaging. It worked especially well in the context of this group.

The idea for the kiwi lesson comes from The Freedom Writers Diary Teacher's Guide by Erin Gruwell.  In the book there is a lesson called the "Peanut Game." I decided to use a kiwi instead of peanuts because of how colorful kiwis are on the inside and to avoid any allergies. 

At the beginning of the activity I pass out a kiwi to each child. I instruct students to explore the outside of the kiwi and to make a list of as many adjectives as they can that describe the kiwi.  I recommend having students pair up to do this part with one student recording the words at a time.  After everyone has come up with the list for the outside of the kiwi, I ask students to share some of the adjectives they come up with. Students usually use words such as ugly, hairy, gross, creepy, etc.  

I then pass out plates, plastic knives and plastic spoons to the children. I instruct them to cut the kiwi in half and scoop the center out with a spoon to taste it. I then instruct students to record a list of words that describe the inside of the kiwi and how it tastes.   I again ask students to share their adjectives with the group. Students use words like sweet, sour, bright, tasty, colorful, cheerful, etc.  

At this point, I ask students to explain what they notice about their two lists of adjectives. Someone usually points out that the words for the outside are negative and the words for the inside are more positive. Students usually also say something like "If I just looked at the kiwi, I wouldn't eat it," or "It tastes really good but you wouldn't know that by looking at it." 

This begins a discussion about being judged and stigma.  We talk about how people sometimes make assumptions about each other because of how they look or the way they dress.  Students share stories about times they were judged by the way they dress, how dark or light their skin is, their religion, background, ethnicity, etc. 

I ask students what they think the take-away message is for this lesson.  Students say "Don't judge someone by the outside," and "It's what's on the inside that counts!"

I wanted students to be able to have a keepsake from the lesson so I cut out brown circles and bright green circles out of card stock using my cricut. After the lesson, students were glued their kiwi pieces together and decorated the inside of the kiwi with seeds.  I invited them to write a message they learned from the lesson on their kiwi.

Card stock circles
Completed kiwi
Students were excited to have a take away from this lesson. They also really enjoyed having a kiwi snack! They keep asking me, "when do we get to eat those fuzzy brown things again?" :)

What lessons do you facilitate that teach students, "It's what's on the inside that counts!"? Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Taking Steps to Make Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Dream a Reality - Part 1

Monday was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.  In honor of Dr. King's legacy, I participated in my district's day of service. Hundreds of volunteers, including school counselors from my district, gathered to work on service projects to support individuals in our community. Together we made MLK day a day ON, not a day off.

In honor of Dr. King's legacy, I wanted to find a lesson that would bring the spirit of acceptance and social justice into the classroom.  I facilitate weekly classroom lessons for students in sixth grade, so I am always looking for engaging lessons. I found some great lesson ideas on the Teaching Tolerance website. I combined aspects of two extension lessons, "Take a Stand" and "Keep Moving Display," from the lesson Dr. King and the Movement. This week, I am facilitating the lesson in the three sixth grade classes.

When students enter my room, I explain that I will be reading three quotes by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and asking them to decide if the quote rang true today.  To prepare for the lesson, I taped an "agree" sign on one side of the room and a "disagree" sign on the other side of the room.  I also printed out quotes to display on the board as I read them.  Below are the quotes I use in the order I read them to students:

“We may all have come on different ships, but we’re on the same boat now.”
–    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.


“Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”
–    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.


“I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”
–    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

After reading each quote, I have students stand up and move to the "agree" side or the "disagree" side.  Once students picked a side, we discussed the quote. I ask students to share with the group why they picked the side they chose.

To make the quotes relevant to school and bullying, I ask students if each quote is true in their school.  Students have very insightful ideas about how students often bully each other because of the color of their skin, the clothes they wear, or how they fix their hair and not "by the content of their character."

After our discussion, I ask students to return to their seats so I can give instructions for the second part of the activity.  I read students another quote by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. from a Teaching Tolerance poster I have hanging in my office. The quote is featured below.

“Now I realize that there are those all over who are telling us that we must slow up. … But we cannot afford to slow up. We have a moral obligation to press on. We have our self-respect to maintain. But even more we can’t afford to slow up because of our love for America and our love for the democratic way of life. … We must keep moving. We must keep going.”
- Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 
From “The Montgomery Story,” an address to the 47th annual NAACP Convention, San Francisco, June 27, 1956.

After reading the quote, I give all of the students a piece of construction paper and ask them to trace their feet.  I explained to students that we were going to "keep moving" by taking steps to make Dr. King's Dream a reality.  After students traced their feet, I instructed them to write "A benefit I receive as a result of Dr. King's legacy is..." on the left foot and "One way I will ensure Dr. King's work keeps moving forward is..."on the right foot. 

I plan to use student's feet to create a display titled "Taking Steps to Make Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Dream a Reality."

Are you planning any lessons/activities connected to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s legacy this week? Comment below, email me, tweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.


Wednesday, August 25, 2010

Integrating Drama and Art into Counseling Lessons

I enjoy integrating drama and art into my counseling lessons as much as possible. In the following post I detail some lessons I facilitated and where to get more ideas!

When I was working at the charter school, I ran an after school club about tolerance and respect. We did many activities, but my favorite was reader's theater, a dramatic reading of a story in script form. The story we used was Crocodile and Ghost Bat Have a Hullabaloo: An Australian Tale of Name Calling from Teaching Tolerance. The students created their own characters for the story out of construction paper, crayons, and googly eyes. I also had them create mosaic style scenes to using cut up construction paper. The students loved this activity!

After the students felt confident reading their lines, we took our show on tour to kindergarten, first, second, and third grade.  The students were excited to share their work and the story with others; the younger students enjoyed hearing and seeing it! I included pictures of "crocodile," "ghost bat," and some of the mosaic scenes students created.

Teaching Tolerance also has a script for a "Pourquoi of Prejudice" titled Why Frogs and Snakes Never Play Together. A pourquoi is a fictional story that explains why something is the way it is. I would like to use Why Frogs and Snakes Never Play Together in the future. As part of the lesson, students can create their own ending for the porquoi.

The Three Billy Goats Gracious is another story on Teaching Tolerance's site that is interactive and could be turned into a reader's theater or play. I actually just got puppets this summer on eBay of three billy goats and a troll to use for this lesson.

I really enjoy integrating art into my lessons too. In We Can Break Down Walls, I utilized another great Teaching Tolerance story, Papalotzin and the Monarchs: A Bilingual Border Tale. As part of my lesson, students colored paper butterflies. A way cheap and easy way to make this activity a more involved craft project would be to create coffee filter butterflies. I have created coffee filter butterflies in the past by using markers and a spray bottle instead of paint. Students enjoy this activity and no two butterflies look exactly alike.

Check out some of the other lessons I have facilitated that incorporate art: BEE Cooperative, BEE Drug Free, Turn Your Cruelty into Kindness, and With Our Own Two Hands.

If you are looking for more ways to integrate art into counseling, I would recommend a FREE pdf book: Crayoloa Dream Makers Drawing on Character. I went to a conference a few years ago where one of the sessions was about a counselor and the art teacher who worked together for an after school program. They utilized Crayola Dream Makers Drawing on Character. I just got the book Crayola Dream Makers After School Programs at the end of the school year last year and I can't wait to use it!

Do you integrate drama or art into your lessons? What is your favorite? Do you have suggestions for resources? Comment below, email me, or visit the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.



Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Celebrating and Honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Life's most persistent and urgent question is: what are you doing for others? - Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

April marks the 42nd anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Death. I was recently informed about efforts to create a National Memorial honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and his legacy.

For more information about the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial visit http://mlkmemorialnews.org/. The site has banners available and a search engine toolbar available for download.

There is a great companion website available for kids called Kids for King. The site has information, activities, and contests for kids.


Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.

Thursday, February 4, 2010

Black History Month Door Decorating Contest: "The Secret Olivia Told Me"

Our school is having a door decorating contest in honor of Black History Month.  I am excited to participate! I think the contest is a great idea to raise awareness and to build excitement about Black History Month.

 I was throwing around a couple different ideas for my door decoration, but I then had an "ah-ha" moment. I happened to glance at my shelf and The Secret Olivia Told Me, a book about rumors, inspired me.

 The Secret Olivia Told Me received a Coretta Scott King Book Award in 2008 for the amazing illustrations by Nancy Devard.  The Coretta Scott King Book Award is given to works that promote and honor the teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., including messages of peace, nonviolent social change, and brotherhood.

One of the art teachers at my school helped me make my door decoration by drawing me the silhouette featured on the front of The Secret Olivia Told Me. I covered the door in white roll paper. I then cut construction paper into fourths to make the bricks. I used red roll paper to make the balloon.

The door turned out better than I expected. I am excited for students to see it. I am planning to read The Secret Olivia Told Me to students in fifth and sixth grade this coming week and do my "Rumors and Toothpaste" lesson with them.


What door decorations have you done? Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.


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Thursday, October 1, 2009

With Our Own Two Hands...

This is the extension of the The Colors of Us Revisited lesson using the book The Colors of Us by Karen Katz.

At the beginning of the next class, We listed to the Jack Johnson song "My Own Two Hands." We spoke about things that the students could do with their own two hands to change the world.

After listening to "My Own Two Hands," the students were instructed to use the sheet of their own unique color to trace their hand print. After they traced their hands, they cut them out. The students were instructed to decorate their hands using crayola construction paper crayons. They could either draw pictures on their hands of their favorite things or make a design.

The students then pasted their hands to a circle with a picture of the world in the center. I went around to each student and asked what they could do to change the world with their own two hands. We used the suggestions that the students came up with as a background for the bulletin board. Some examples were: "With my own two hands I can... be gentle, draw, help set the table, create art, give my pets love, clean up the Earth, and help others."

You can preview to the Jack Johnson song at the bottom of this post.






What creative lessons have you facilitated about diversity and tolerance? Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.




Tuesday, September 29, 2009

"The Colors of US" Revisited


One of my favorite lessons I have ever facilitated was a tolerance and diversity lesson using the book The Colors of Us by Karen Katz.  I read The Colors of Us to a first grade class. I then had the students trace their hands and mix crayon colors to find their own beautiful color.

I told the art teacher at my current school about the lesson. We came up with a way to collaborate and teach first graders an important lesson about diversity and tolerance.

The art teacher read The Colors of Us to both of the first grade classes. After reading the book, she gave students the opportunity to use paint to find their own unique and beautiful color. The art teacher showed the students how
they would mix the colors together to find a color that matched their skin color.

Each table was given four colors: orange, white, brown, and dark brown. She demonstrated that she would need white, orange, and a little bit of brown to make a color that matched her skin color. Once the students went back to their tables, they did an amazing job of finding a color that matched their skin color. They were instructed to paint a whole sheet of construction paper their color.

I will post about the extension lesson soon!


What creative lessons do you use to teach students about diversity and tolerance? Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.





Tuesday, May 26, 2009

What Can Kiwis Teach Us About Tolerance?


I taught a lesson on tolerance to a group of third and fourth graders. I showed the students a kiwi and asked if anyone could tell me what it was. All of the students had seen and tasted a kiwi before. I asked them what they thought of kiwis when the first saw one. Students gave descriptive words such as "nasty, hairy, and ugly." Since the students have tried kiwis before, I focused the discussion on how it feels to be judged by the outside. Students commented that they felt sad and kind of angry when people judged them by the outside.

I asked students what lesson we could learn from kiwis. One student stated that the lesson that we learn from kiwis is "don't judge a book by it's cover." He commented that just because a book may be strange on the outside doesn't mean it isn't a good book. I gave the students an opportunity at the end to have some kiwi fruit that I brought. I also gave the students a bookmark that is pictured. The front reads, "What can kiwis teach us about tolerance?" and the back reads, "It's what's on the inside that counts."

In the future, I would like to have the students assemble the bookmarks themselves and write their own message that they learned from the kiwis. I think it would be neat to make a bulletin board with the kiwi theme using students' original ideas about tolerance.


What creative lessons do you teach about tolerance? Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

"My life belongs to the community..."


"I am of the opinion that my life belongs to the community, and as long as i live, it is my privlege to do for it whatever I can," by George Bernard Shaw

This poster was featured in the Spring 2009 issue of Teaching Tolerance Magazine. I love this quote and wanted to share it with others! If you click on the poster you will be directed to the Teaching Tolerance website!




What are your favorite posters or quotes? Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.

Monday, April 27, 2009

The Lorax "Unless..."

The Lorax (Classic Seuss)"Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot,
it's not going to get better. It's not."
The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
In celebration of Earth Day, I read The Lorax by Dr. Seuss to a 5th grade class. I used this classic Dr. Seuss book to teach students that they have the power to make a difference, not only for the environment, but for their school and community.

I asked if anyone in the class had ever read or heard The Lorax before. Only one student in the class had read the book. The students were very engaged in the story. I asked them questions during while reading such as "How do you think the Lorax felt when the Oncelor did not heed his advice?" and "How do you think the other characters, such as the Barbaloots felt during the story?" The students had great answers. They commented that the Barbaloots may have felt "devastated," "depressed," "lost," etc.

After reading The Lorax I asked students more questions to facilitate discussion. I asked students, "Why does the Lorax speak for the trees?" The students answered, "they could not speak for themselves," "they were afraid," and "the Oncelor might not have listened." I asked, "Has there ever been a time in your life when you spoke up for someone or someone spoke up for you?" Most of the students answered that they have had someone stand up for them. One student told the group that just that day he helped two third-graders who were about to get into a fight. He told the boys that it was not a smart decision.

I also asked the students, "What does the Oncelor mean when he says, 'Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not.'?" The students had great answers. They said that it means, "even one person can make a difference," "if you don't do something no one will," "everyone is responsible for helping out." I asked the students for suggestions on how they could make a difference in their school and community. Some of the suggestions were, "cleaning up trash when you see it," "helping kids to work out problems without fighting," and "respecting each other."

I love using classic books and adding a school counseling twist to them! Check out other Dr. Seuss books I have used for lessons.

For more information and tips for using The Lorax to teach students about the environment click on one of the Lorax pictures.

Are there any Earth Day inspired lessons you use with students? Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.

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