Wednesday, April 29, 2009

"My life belongs to the community..."


"I am of the opinion that my life belongs to the community, and as long as i live, it is my privlege to do for it whatever I can," by George Bernard Shaw

This poster was featured in the Spring 2009 issue of Teaching Tolerance Magazine. I love this quote and wanted to share it with others! If you click on the poster you will be directed to the Teaching Tolerance website!




What are your favorite posters or quotes? Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.

Monday, April 27, 2009

The Lorax "Unless..."

The Lorax (Classic Seuss)"Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot,
it's not going to get better. It's not."
The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
In celebration of Earth Day, I read The Lorax by Dr. Seuss to a 5th grade class. I used this classic Dr. Seuss book to teach students that they have the power to make a difference, not only for the environment, but for their school and community.

I asked if anyone in the class had ever read or heard The Lorax before. Only one student in the class had read the book. The students were very engaged in the story. I asked them questions during while reading such as "How do you think the Lorax felt when the Oncelor did not heed his advice?" and "How do you think the other characters, such as the Barbaloots felt during the story?" The students had great answers. They commented that the Barbaloots may have felt "devastated," "depressed," "lost," etc.

After reading The Lorax I asked students more questions to facilitate discussion. I asked students, "Why does the Lorax speak for the trees?" The students answered, "they could not speak for themselves," "they were afraid," and "the Oncelor might not have listened." I asked, "Has there ever been a time in your life when you spoke up for someone or someone spoke up for you?" Most of the students answered that they have had someone stand up for them. One student told the group that just that day he helped two third-graders who were about to get into a fight. He told the boys that it was not a smart decision.

I also asked the students, "What does the Oncelor mean when he says, 'Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not.'?" The students had great answers. They said that it means, "even one person can make a difference," "if you don't do something no one will," "everyone is responsible for helping out." I asked the students for suggestions on how they could make a difference in their school and community. Some of the suggestions were, "cleaning up trash when you see it," "helping kids to work out problems without fighting," and "respecting each other."

I love using classic books and adding a school counseling twist to them! Check out other Dr. Seuss books I have used for lessons.

For more information and tips for using The Lorax to teach students about the environment click on one of the Lorax pictures.

Are there any Earth Day inspired lessons you use with students? Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

Happy Earth Day!


Stay tuned for my reflections on an Earth Day lesson for 5th graders!


How do you celebrate Earth Day at school? Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.

Sunday, April 19, 2009

"The Sneetches," Diversity, and Cooperation

"The Sneetches got really quite smart on that day.
That day they decided that Sneetches are Sneetches
And no kind of Sneetch is the best on the beaches.
That day all the Sneetches forgot about stars
and whether they had one, or not, upon thars."
The Sneetches by Dr. Seuss

First Graders listening to The Sneetches by Dr. Seuss


I taught a lesson for first-grade classes on respect, diversity, cooperation, and including others. First, I read The Sneetches by Dr. Seuss to the students. The students seemed to really enjoy the book. While we read The Sneetches we talked about how the plain-bellied Sneetches felt when the star-bellied Sneetches would not include them in activities. Some comments the students made were that the Sneetches without stars felt sad, angry, lonely, left out, depressed, etc. We also discussed "okay" and "not okay" behavior. Students commented that the star-bellied Sneetches were showing "not okay" behavior when they would not let the plain-bellied Sneetches play games and eat food with them. At the end of the book the Sneetches were displaying "okay" behavior when they all played together.

Students playing Sneetch Ball
After reading The Sneetches, we played "Sneetch Ball" as a group. I brought stars cut out from construction paper so that students could put them in their shirt. I gave every other student a star. To play the game, students with "a star upon thars" had to throw a beach ball to a student "with no star upon thars." In our game of "Sneetch Ball" everyone was included. In the future I will use this activity for slightly older students. The first-graders I worked with had difficulty throwing the ball to each other.

I love using classic books and adding a school counseling twist to them! Check out other Dr. Seuss books I have used for lessons.

What Dr. Seuss books to you use to facilitate lessons or activities with students? Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.

Pennsylvania School Counselor Association Conference

"Imprisoned Spirits" presentation at PSCA (L to R: Dr. Bill McHenry, Clare Kenny, Natasha Nayduch, Danielle Conrad and Dr. Marcy Douglass)

At the Pennsylvania School Counseling Association (PSCA) Conference, my professors, fellow school counseling colleagues, and I presented our work with children of incarcerated parents. Our session was titled "Imprisoned Spirits: Leading Change in Helping Students with Incarcerated Parents." We had a great turn out. I was excited by people's interest in our topic and their willingness to work with children of incarcerated parents.

My groups of children of incarcerated parents are coming to an end this coming week. We have our last session on Monday and our party on Friday. The students are so excited about the party on Friday, but are sad for the groups to end.


Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.
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