Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Friendship Raps

I am facilitating character education with kindergarten through fourth grade. I have a variety of themes I am touching on in the classes. For friendship, I worked with third and fourth grade to create their own "friendship raps."

Before creating their raps, I had each class listen a rap "Something for Me, Something for You," found on the CD in the Teaching Tolerance "I Will be Your Friend" educator kit. The students really enjoyed the rap. After listening to the rap, I had the students talk about what they learned from the rap. They learned messages such as "you should respect people," "we should be friends with people, it doesn't matter what color we are," and "you should include other people."

I then instructed the students to each come up with a line to make a unique friendship rap as a class. The students were very enthusiastic and came up with some great lines. I had each student raise his or her hand and share the line with the class. A fourth grade student shared a great line that I have already when talking to students about friendship. When explaining that you should treat others like you want to be treated, she stated "it's like a boomerang, whatever you do to other's comes back to you." I thought this was a great visual for students and helped them understand how if you give respect you will get respect.

After they shared a line, I had them write the line in permanent marker on a slip of pre-cut construction paper. As the students gave me a line, I wrote it on the board. Each student contributed one line. I typed up the rap for each class and distributed the rap to the students. I used the construction paper slips into a colorful chain to showcase with the students completed raps.

A week later, I went into the classroom and asked for student volunteers to perform the class rap to the class. Their enthusiasm was contagious. The other students in the class clapped out a beat while their classmates rapped they lyrics. It was a really fun way to teach students what it means to be a friend.


How do you use music to teach students about respect? Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.

"The Colors of US" Revisited


One of my favorite lessons I have ever facilitated was a tolerance and diversity lesson using the book The Colors of Us by Karen Katz.  I read The Colors of Us to a first grade class. I then had the students trace their hands and mix crayon colors to find their own beautiful color.

I told the art teacher at my current school about the lesson. We came up with a way to collaborate and teach first graders an important lesson about diversity and tolerance.

The art teacher read The Colors of Us to both of the first grade classes. After reading the book, she gave students the opportunity to use paint to find their own unique and beautiful color. The art teacher showed the students how
they would mix the colors together to find a color that matched their skin color.

Each table was given four colors: orange, white, brown, and dark brown. She demonstrated that she would need white, orange, and a little bit of brown to make a color that matched her skin color. Once the students went back to their tables, they did an amazing job of finding a color that matched their skin color. They were instructed to paint a whole sheet of construction paper their color.

I will post about the extension lesson soon!


What creative lessons do you use to teach students about diversity and tolerance? Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.





Tuesday, September 1, 2009

Reach for the Stars!


At the beginning of August, I was hired as a long-term substitute counselor for a charter school in the Greater Pittsburgh Area. I currently serve students in kindergarten through eighth grade. I am excited to work with the students!

One of the first things that I created, since I started,was a bulletin board focusing on messages I want to teach students from the book Good-bye Bully Machine by Debbie Fox and Allan L. Beane, Ph.D. I incorporated stars (part of the school's logo) and multicultural hands into my bulletin board.

The messages include: "We know our differences make us interesting and UNIQUE," "We speak up if we see others being treated unfairly," "We treat others the way we would like to be treated," We do our best to solve problems peacefully," "We like it that people are different," and "We treat others with respect."








What creative bulletin boards have you created? Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.



 
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