Saturday, March 30, 2013

"The Quiet Kid" Giveaway!

I was so excited to share The Quiet Kid with you in Thursday's post that I decided to host a giveaway!


One lucky winner will win a copy of The Quiet Kid I want to know how you would use The Quiet Kid in your work with students!
For this giveaway I am using Rafflecopter. The giveaway opens March 30, 2013 and will close at midnight April 6, 2013.

***IMPORTANT: In order for your entry to count you MUST leave a comment in the comment section below about how you would use this item in your work as a school counselor!***


PLEASE NOTE: the voting widget below may take up to a minute to load and may not work in Internet Explorer. Winners are chosen randomly via Random.org and will be contacted directly via email. 

Comment below, tweetcontact Danielle, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources. Connect with Danielle via emailTwitterPinterestLinkedInGoogle+, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.



22 comments:

  1. I would use this book individually with kids who are quiet to validate that being quiet is okay and who they are. I would also have them take it home to share with their family and then share it with the teacher also. I might even use it at the beginning of the year when I see the class lists and notice a particular student who I know is quiet but the new teacher doesn't. I will share it with that teacher also. I could use it when we talk about temperaments in our parent class and teacher meeting. Thanks for the heads up on a great book!

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  2. I would love to use this with some of my "shy" students. I can often relate to this as I was "the quiet kid" when I was a child (and still sometimes now). I also have a few students who are diagnosed with selective mutism, and I think this tool would be helpful for them as we'll. bibliotheca pay is such an excellent way to relate with my students.

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  3. Although I have not yet read this book, I would love to use it! As I am currently in my internship, I have been working with a variety of students and running many groups. In April, I am starting a group for fifth grade students who have been identified as students who have strong leadership qualities inside them, but are shy and not quite sure how to use them amongst their peers. I could begin this group my reading this book to them and normalize that it's okay to be quiet. Also, these students are moving to the junior high next year (a place where students often try and be who they aren't just to fit in). Sharing this story with them could again, help them understand that being an introvert isn't a negative quality! I could also use the book in classroom guidance & with individuals--or even with my high school individuals as a change of pace and to again normalize being "quiet" :)

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  4. Being the mother of a "quiet kid" I am excited to use this book both with my daughter and other students like her. As an elementary school counselor I use a ton of books when working with students and would love to add another awesome story to my library!

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  5. I would use this book in individual counseling as well as a classroom guidance situation to show students that students express themselves in different ways.

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  6. While I agree with everyone else's wonderful ideas, I think I would utilize this book most in small group settings, particularly with social skills groups, or groups such as the one that Erin describes above. I think that every group, just as every classroom, has quiet kids. I think this book would really give them something to relate to and help them realize that they're not alone. I also think it could empower them to see their quietness as a strength, not a weakness. Thank you for sharing, Danielle!

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  7. After reading the post yesterday I was thinking how I would use this book as well. I think I'd use it in a guidance lesson as I'd want ALL students to understand the "introvert". Often it's the introverts that get overlooked (in my opinion)as the students who are chatty and boisterous while around others get the attention. I'd also read it in a staff meeting to bring awareness to the teachers and encourage them to find ways to celebrate those quiet kids who seem to blend into the background.

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  8. I was the quiet kid. I am the quiet adult. Often misunderstood and pressured to be someone I wasn't, I really connect with my introvert students who face the same pressures I faced. Literature is powerful - this story would help me comfort and encourage the quiet kids at my school to simply be okay with who they are. I believe this story would assist in giving the message that quiet is not only okay, but needed in our world. The quiet kids are needed - what an important message to hear!

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  9. I'm a K-5 school counselor and I would use The Quiet Kid (not having read it yet) and maybe incorporate a story about extroverts in classroom guidance about career exploration. I think the introvert/extrovert continuum is an important attribute to talk about when exploring the world of work. Rather than thinking only about the tasks and duties assigned to a certain career, this book could open the discussion to talking more about the setting and the interactions one has with others in a chosen career. I'm excited about the possibilities this book could help me to achieve in my school!

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  10. I am a K-2 Counselor and would use this book in small group guidance with a self-esteem or friendship group.

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  11. As a school counseling intern in a primary school, I have come across a few students who were very much similar to me in elementary school (and introvert). One in particular i struggling academically in class and does not like to participate, and feels much pressure from her parents to excel. I believe this book can be useful in showing her that it's ok to be the quiet one and that there are other ways to show evidence of understanding a lesson or asking questions. It's amazing all the wonderful resources I am learning about on these blogs to use in my future school counseling career!

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  12. We are heading into our Diversity Unit. I would use this resource to validate and celebrate those of us who share who we are by quietly listening. We have a lot of great things to share but look for perfect opportunities where we feel safe and appreciated.

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  13. I would use this book in a self-esteem small support group or with an individual student. Paired with some of the other fun resources that were posted for this book here on School Counselor Blog, this would certainly be a great addition to my small group repertoire!

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  14. I have a group of girls that I want to share this with. 2 are very outgoing and the 3rd is very shy and often misunderstood by the others.

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  15. I would use this book with individual students and small groups. Mostly I would like it for a resource to send home to parents who want me to "counsel" their kids out of being introverted!

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  16. This would be a great resource for classroom guidance when we talk about individuality and appreciating differences in each other.

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  17. I am just starting out as a new school counselor and am trying to build up my book resources. I see a lot of introverted children who would really love this book. I would use it in both individual and group sessions with these students to show them that it is okay to be introverted and that sometimes we just need some quiet time to ourselves. Rather than trying to change their temperaments, this book would help me show them their strengths.

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  18. I am trained in school counseling as part of my teacher training. However that's not my specialization. I think that sometimes, the people who need to read books like these don't have access to them. that's a loss for both the teachers and all of the students in the class.

    In a group setting, I've noticed that the majority of the people tend to be quiet, or less outspoken. Sometimes the ones who talk a lot don't take as much time to carefully consider what they are saying. A good teacher encourages everyone to both speak and listen. Extroverts can benefit by being quiet sometimes and quiet students can benefit by speaking up and sharing their ideas.

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  19. I would use this book in my small group for shy students to let them know that it's ok to be quiet, and I may also use the book as a resource for parents who want their children to be more outgoing.

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  20. I would give the book to my friend who has a "quiet" kid. I would also buy the book for myself for future reference.

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  21. I am a pk-2nd grade counselor. This book would be great as a guidance lesson to show that we all have different personalities and that's ok. I would even use it in a group or individual session to go deeper into personalities and indivduality. It would even be great at parent trainings, I have many parents that think their child has low self esteem or something is wrong because they tend to be "loners" or "withdrawn". What a great book.!

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  22. This is a great book to help students embrace our differences. Often, introverts are not embraced. I have a few students in mind that would enjoy hearing this book and help them feel more confident in who they are. I could use it in a guidance lesson on diversity and uniqueness.

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