Sunday, March 15, 2009

When We Work Together the Picture is Complete!


These pictures are from a classroom guidance lesson I did on cooperation with all of the first grade classes. First, I had the students help me draw a picture using only one color. Then, I asked them what we could do to make the picture better. Eventually, students stated that we needed to have more color. We talked about how boring the world would be if it was only one color.

We read The Crayon Box that Talked by Shane DeRolf. The book explains that everyone needs to work together in order to create a beautiful picture. We talked about "okay" and "not okay" behaviors that the crayons were doing. In order for the picture to be complete in the The Crayon Box that Talked, the crayons had to work together and use all of their colors.

I divided the students into groups of four and asked them to draw a picture as a group. I gave them all a large sheet of paper, markers, and crayons to use. They had to make decisions about which side was the top of the picture, what they would draw, and who would draw what.

Afterward, we discussed what they liked or didn't like about the activity. The students spoke about how it was hard to work together. They had to communicate with each other through asking questions, sharing, and being kind to each other. The students enjoyed the activity. It was neat to see what students could create as a group.




What creative lessons do you facilitate about cooperation? Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.

  

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

When Sophie Gets Angry...

I created this tree for a lesson about anger.

I read 1st graders for the book When Sophie Gets Angry - Really, Really Angry... by Molly Bang. We talked about things that make us angry, such as when somebody pushes in line, when someone takes my crayons, when someone will not play with me, etc.

While reading the book we talked about "okay" and "not okay" behaviors that Sophie was doing. I asked students to give me a "thumbs up" for "okay" behaviors and a "thumbs down" for "not okay" behaviors.

After reading When Sophie Gets Angry--Really, Really Angry..., we played a game with the tree pictured. I gave students examples of things that made them or Sophie angry and had students put a leaf on the tree for their response.

The students enjoyed coming up with positive ways to handle their anger such as, tell the teacher, count to 10, ask another friend to play, take deep breaths, etc.

To make the tree I used brbrown roll paper, blue roll paper, and construction paper for the leaves. I laminated the tree and put velcro on the branches so students could pull the leaves off and on.

You could also turn this lesson into a bulletin board by making it larger and putting ways to calm down on the leaves.


What creative lessons or activities do you use to teach students about anger? Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.




Monday, March 2, 2009

The Colors of US!

The Colors of US!
One of the first classroom guidance lessons I did as a long-term substitute counselor was about diversity.

I read the book The Colors of Us by Karen Katz to first grade. We talked about how no one is black, white, yellow, or red. We are all a beautiful color.

I had the students trace their hand and mix crayon colors together until they found their color. I also had them write something unique about themselves.

Students enjoyed finding their own unique color and making their hands. Here is a picture of the hands students created.





What activities do you facilitate about diversity? 
Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.




Sunday, March 1, 2009

We Can Break Down Walls!


I did a lesson about breaking down the walls of tolerance with a third grade English-immersion class.

I read Papalotzin and the Monarchs:A Bilingual Border Tale by Rigoberto González to the students.

The story is about the Great North building a wall to keep everyone on the Great South out. Both the Great North and the Great South suffer. Papalotzin convinces everyone to help break down the wall so everyone can move freely again.

After reading Papalotzin and the Monarchs, I asked students what walls existed in their classroom. Students talked about how sometimes they get treated differently because of the color of their skin. Students commented that sometimes people don't want to let you into their group because you aren't cool enough. I asked for suggestions about how we could break down walls in their classroom. The students suggested: being kind to each other, sharing, letting others join the group, asking people to play with us at recess.

As a follow up activity, I asked to students to color their own unique butterfly so that we could add color to the wall outside of their classroom. The butterflies serve as a reminder to students that they have the power to break down walls of intolerance.

What creative lessons do you use to teach students about diversity and tolerance? Comment below, email metweet, or share on the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page!

Danielle is a K-12 Certified School Counselor, Nationally Certified Counselor, and blogger at School Counselor Blog, a place where school counselors share innovative ideas, creative lesson plans, and quality resources.  Contact Danielle via email, follow her on twitter, and become a fan of the School Counselor Blog Facebook Page.
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